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The Celtics Collective
The Celtics Collective

Episode 2 · 3 months ago

Scot Pollard talks almost fighting KG, Playing with Paul Pierce in College and NBA, and Almost Joining the WWE

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

11-Year NBA player and former NBA Champion with the Boston Celtics joins The Celtics Collective Podcast and tells amazing stories about his NBA career starting with the Sacramento Kings and how their offense changed the NBA, to what made him sign with the Boston Celtics. Scot credits Paul Pierce for leading the team to the 2008 NBA Championship. He talks about playing with Kevin Garnett after spending his career hating him, and he shares how he almost ended up in the WWE. Listen to the full episode of The Celtics Collective now.  

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Hosts: Madi Kroll, Adam Taylor, and Sean Deveney

Executive Producer: Thomas Darro

What's good. Everybody. Welcome to the Celtics Connective podcast, or to you by heavy on Celtics and heavy unsports. We're here to keep your finger on the pulse of all things Celtics basketball. You're going to be joined by Sean Devaney, resident NBA inside there, giving you the inside workings of an NBA Front Office, giving you some trade rumors that you may not see or you may see after you hear the episode. When aggregation occurs, Maddie role at hostess who likes to crocheted everybody and anybody for no apparent reason. And then you've got me, Adam Taylor, who's the X is, and those guy and generally I'm just not pleased with anything I see. So make sure you tune in. All right, welcome back, everybody. This is the celtics collective podcast. If you don't recognize me, I'm filling in for Adam and Maddie. Both our own vacations, both in different places. Adam is on a beach somewhere. He did offer to Joe to join us, but did uh say that his words might be slurred, so we we left him out of the podcast today. But but I'm here with Shawn. I was outvoted on that time. I really wanted to have him on with the slurred speech, but maybe maybe, uh, maybe the best that he's not. I I think he's already funny without it. I can only imagine where the podcast would go and some of the some of the like different opinions and things that we'd get if if he was on a beach somewhere slurring his words but giving his hot takes out Um. But yeah, so I wanted to I'm basically here just to introduce kind of the interview that you guys did with with Scott Pollard. I GREW UP IN UTAH. Scott Pollard mentions. UH, he's probably related to sixty of people that are that are from Utah. So I've been familiar with him from some time. But he's an eleven year he played eleven years in the NBA. Um won a championship with the Boston Celtics, but is known most probably for his time with the kings and Pacers. But I want to ask you, Shan, what some of your favorite things from the interview with Scott were. Yeah, it was. It was great just to talk to him because when I first started out as a as a young reporter, uh in the early two thousands. You know his his Sacramento Kings were they were the thing, man, they were the new thing. They were obviously the Lakers were the dominant team, but the Kings, we were playing the style of basketball's it's just great to be able to talk to him a little bit about that. You know, I mentioned that that his team does not get enough credit for the the evolution of the game. Wasn't surprised to find that that he uh, he agreed with me on that. But yeah, there was some really cool things. We talked about Kansas in time at Kansas, playing with Paul Pierce who, uh surprisingly, had the nickname bandy when he first got to I'm not sure that's something Paul Pierce wants to be well known out there, but but that was kind of funny, kind of a cool story. Of course we also brought up this rumor that he had this fight with Kevin Garnett, uh in Japan, uh and uh and he went into some detail about that. One of the things that he said that I thought was great was, you know, at some point you're gonna play with guys that you hate. Uh and and he said he hated Garnett before he joined that two thousand seven Celtics team. Uh, you mentioned Reggie Miller was another one that he had played with two so I thought that was a pretty cool moment as well. So we also talked about some, you know, some of today's issues, you know, with Kevin Garnett, I'm sorry, Kevin Durant, obviously, and and what's going on with the nets and and he had some pretty good thoughts on that as well. Yeah, he told I mean I was blown away by just the amount of storytelling and me as a producer, my job is to kind of cut the clips and find the interesting, the most interesting things we talked about, and I found myself finding like twenty two, twenty five talking points that we could go off in the episode. And I think you're right that Paul Pierce may not want his bandy nickname to to live on. I think the truth is a lot cooler than Um bandy. But yeah, he told some really good stories and and and it's funny how he talked about how he hated Mike Bibby from from college. And I really enjoyed your question from how it felt he chose Kansas over U C L A and Um Arizona and when he went on to lose ultimate, well one he lost Arizona, but both teams went on to win the U N C a National Championship. And he talked about hating Mike Bibby and all these players he ends up playing with later in his career and he was very candid about his feelings and stories there. And so I'm excited for for all of you to listen to this episode that we did with Scott Pollard and Um, encourage you all to follow, Rate Review everywhere you can the Celtics collective podcast. Um, Sean, Maddie and Adam I'll do a great job and are bringing you some great celtics content and so I as a producer, please do all that. Um, share it with your friends, share it with other Celtics fans and we appreciate you being with us. What's up, guys? Welcome back to the Celtics collective podcast. We are super excited today be as we have our first guest, Scott Pollard, who I don't...

...think needs an introduction, but Um, we're going to get all the history and uh, have some fun on this podcast. Yeah, Scott's bringing energy. Everybody else is lacking respect. NBA Champion, Scott Pollard, NBA champion. We need some respects on that name from the get go. I mean he's a champion in life, I feel like at this point, from reality TV and on the court, and you should see my wife. I have seen your wife. You you kind of outkicked your coverage. They're good for you. It's totally my personality. It's the tall man proview right, love it, love it. Great Way to start. Just absolute chaos. I'll let sean go with the first question because I know Sean's the NBA historian amongst us, so he's going to have that. Just means I'm old. I guess that's but ill. We were trying to be nice about appreciate it. Well, I think Scott will appreciate because I I I listened to people say, well, the warriors have changed the game. Uh, you know the way that they play, and you know, some people who maybe are a little older will say no, no, it's the Phoenix Suns with Mike d'antoni. But I know, and Scott knows, that twenty years ago, if you were watching the Sacramento Kings, at what you see from the warriors now. On the way the game is now. It was the kings that really started that, because basketball at that time was unwatchable. But but the kings played a completely different style of game. The Mavericks too, I think. Uh, to an extent. Would you agree with that? Scott? Do you think that the Kings don't get enough credit for the way the game is now? Uh? Yeah, I I would agree with that statement, that the Kings to two statements, that the Kings started that with the big men shooting threes and evolved moving around to every player on the offense, everybody getting shots, everybody sharing the ball and everybody being happy if they got a ton of shots or if they don't get a ton of shots, as long as we win. Uh. And then, yeah, that we don't get enough credit. I agree with that because, Um, we we had biggs that shot, we had bigs that passed, we had bigs that were stopping at the three point line before it was cool. It was coming out of you know, those early two thousands, were coming out of the nineties. Everybody just kicked the ship out of each other all the time. And you know, Games in the East, in the Eastern Conference, my rookie year I was in Detroit. We'd win a game eight, five to eighty. I mean, who's rough when? Yeah, you went from from from that. Your next stop right at the Sacramento you guys playing the conference file was at the game name six against Detroit. You Guys Lost Conference finals. Final score. Yeah, that was actually NBA basketball. Yeah, and you know, and two years earlier than that, I was with Sacramento in two thousand one or two and we had said, I think, a franchise record and maybe an NBA record at the time because we scored sixty one points in the first half against the Dallas Mavericks. And I know that does the people do that all the time, but it hadn't been done for a long time. If it had, and if it wasn't an NBA record, I'm pretty sure it was a keens franchise record. And so we brought a lot of fun to the game and and that that fast paced, tempo a lot of scoring. That the more fans like. I mean yeah, there's purists out there and they're like, Oh man, all they do is Jack up threes whatever, and I'm one of those. I don't really love that every shot to three. That's not my thing. I don't care, though. Basketball is jazz music. It is always evolved, it will always evolve and it's always because of the best players, just like in jazz music. So when the best players are doing every single thing you can do with the basketball, everyone else has to get inline and follow their lead, and so it's just gonna be that way. But I love being on those Sacramento Kings teams. That my favorite part of my career. I was the longest I was anywhere. I committed to every team I was on. I wanted to be a piston for life. And then I got traded to Atlanta. I wanted to be Atlanta for life. I lasted there for about I don't know, bed and breakfast. Uh, they got me a couple of weeks later, Um, and then I signed the Sacramento I want to be there for the rest, you know, for the rest of my career, and they traded me to Indiana. I want to be here for the rest of my career. Three years my my last three years of that contract. WE'RE UP SIGNED WITH CLEVELAND. I was like, you know what, it is great. I'M A teammateerm Abron I'll be here for the end of my career, which was that year, because that was my tenth year. Little Nugget, when I was a little kid, my goal was to make into the NBA and play ten years and then retire. Uh, and that's what I did. After my tenth year was Cleveland. We got to the NBA finals. I've been to the Western conmence finals, in the Eastern Conference finals twice, the NBA finals. I was like I was the only year in my entire basketball career, dating back to my freshman year of high school, all four years of college and, except for my rookie year, even years in the NBA. But my...

...rookie year was the only year I didn't play in the postseason. So I was always on really good teams and I never want to ring. So I was like, I'm it's never gonna happen. I've done ten years in my goal and I get done with Cleveland and and Boston calls and said Hey, come help us with a championship. I said no, I'm good. Uh, you know, I'm relatively healthy, nothing's really broken. I had healed from my broken back and I was like yeah, I'm I'm good, and then you know, some other people talked me into it and had a blast. I Love Boston. We all know. You guys all know what happened there. But the first day I was there we were practicing and I rolled my ankle really bad and uh tried to play you through it couldn't. went to Europe and then they sent me home from Europe. They went on to London and from Rome I got sent home because my ankle blew up over there, and that was kind of expected because I at least be with the training staff, but they sent me home to the assistant training staff and uh so I got an M R I and they were like look, you're getting surgery and I was like no, what's the cover? You know, like four months. I said, no, I'm not getting surgery. What's what are my options? Like, well, you can trying to make it through the year, and I said, all right, I'm gonna do that because if I get surgery now, I'm not back till February. They're gonna replace me. and February comes around and guess what it gave out? And that's when I had surgery. Uh, and there was nothing I could do about that point. It a completely ruptured tending in my lege, and so that's when I got surgery, and so I still didn't actually win a championship, but I got I got the ring and I take the credit for that as a for all the aforementioned teams from leaking back to high school that could have, would have, should have played in the postseason and had state title aspirations and the N C double a title aspirations and and NBA title aspirations, and so I wear that ring for all those teams. Now we definitely still consider you a champion. I'm glad you brought up Boston, though, because I have a fun question for you. I hear that you rolled into Boston with a bullet, but I cannot find a photo online. I have done a crazy amount of digging. Is is true? Can you confirm? Uh, not on purpose, I think. I think what's what's possible is my hair was getting a little longer and I was just kind of Ben Franklining on top. So it was just kind of long hair balld guy, because it was just getting thinner. But I did not cut the top. It was just I had a little feet and it's worse now than it was then, but like it was just kind of thin on top, but it was an intentional mument. It was just I was Ben Franklin then. It was kind of flowing in the back. So I was like a founding father with the hairstyle there not not really party in the back and business up front. It was more like put me on a dollar bill or something like that. That's why you rolled your ankle right, like I got to distract these people. Yeah, I was like, don't look at my hair, look at my swollen ankle. No, that's awesome. Thank you for sharing that. So one of the one of the stories that came out in the two fags like that Impi ship team, the o eight team, was that the big men used to have these g unique practices and big men just going out right, just more in each of the left, right and center. Would you part of any of those before the ankle gave out, or is that why your ankle got rolled? Well, we did the that must have been later in the season, uh, because because early in the season I was rehabing through the preseason and then regular season started and I was good to go. Uh, and you know, I I probably didn't participate in those just because I was still trying to nurse that ankle and they were like you don't need extra wear and tear of practices enough. It's a long season and I knew it was my last year. Like my body was like we're good, you make it through this year, we're good. So I wasn't doing anything extracurricular. So that would have been after practice if the big men were going at it like that and I wasn't a part of it. How about if we go just back a little bit further, before the Celtics? You know, even before your your NBA career, you were a teammate of pretty pretty prominent so think, and that's Paul Pierce. What do you what do you remember about him from from your days at Kansas and and and when he arrived there, because I think he was a pretty young guy when he got there. Yeah, well, when he came on his recruiting trip I think he was fifteen, uh, and when he got the campus he was sixteen and he turned seventeen shortly after he got to campus his freshman year. So he was really young, Um and just headphones, didn't talk much, really shy. Not Surprising when you when you got a bunch of personalities like we had on that Kansas team and then you're a seventeen year old kid. But it didn't take long for us to see how good that kid was gonna be. We called him bamby because he was still so skinny and he was all elbows and knees and he just going to practice and his elbow would pop somebody on this side and then pop somebody over there and then he would dunk on somebody. We're like, Damn, Bamby, take it easy, don't injure everybody on the way to the basket Um. But you know, he did some so many amazing things as a seventeen, eighteen year old freshman. We were just like wow, okay, yeah, he's gonna be a superstar. And he was already good.

I'm not saying he wasn't great, but we knew that there was going to be a whole ceiling that was that was for the rest of us, unmatchable, unattainable, and and his ceiling was a lot higher than the rest of us, and so we just we were happy to be there at the beginning. And you know, he's not like a wild and crazy guy, so he's always kind of mellow, but he did come out of his show. Uh, you know, stopped wearing headphones twenty four hours a day so we can actually speak with him and he was yeah, it was a lot less shy after that. But you know, we gave him a nickname and all that kind of stuff he had. He had lots of nicknames, so I'm not going to share those, Um, but yeah, he that. That was kind of how I've named people on the team. I give everybody a nickname so I can remember because I don't know. That's just how I am. I give people nicknames. Is it true that you were going to go to Arizona? Did you commit to Arizona at one point and then and then wind up at Kansas and you know, I guess the follow after that would be. was there a little extras there? A Um, yeah, thanks. I graduated high school in San Diego and I really wanted to stay in California. I wanted to stay close to home. Kansas, as far as I was concerned, was near Connecticut. I just didn't care about anything east of the Mississippi or even close to the Mississippi, and I know Kansas is right in the middle. It's not east of the Mississippi, but it's all the same to me. When I was growing up in San Diego, so I wanted to go to U C L A. One of my brothers went to U C at U S C and I just wasn't right situation for me. That time. I took a trip to U C L A and it just wasn't right. It didn't feel right for me. Coach errick was the coach at the time and it just didn't seem like the right fit for me. Um, although I really wanted to play college basketball with Charles o'bannon because we had got to know each other at some of the camps and and playoffs. Back to his team and of Andre Jones knock us out of the state tournament our senior year of high school. But Um, Charles and I were united as Piston Rookies together we got drafted Pistons Togemmer, so that was cool. Uh, sorry about a side note, but Um, so I took my trip to Arizona. Well, I took a trip to B Y u. If you want a real side now, my mom, I was born in Utah and my my whole family is Mormon. If you live in Utah Right now, there's a sixty seven percent chance we're related. I'm related to a LOT OF PEOPLE IN UTAH. There's a whole bunch of them. Yeah, my dad's in the State of Utah Hall of fame and so and my mom. I think her family traces all the way back to Joseph Smith themselves. So there's a whole lot of us in there. Um. But you know, they took me on a horseback and I was like wrong, Dude, wrong, you missed, missed. Yeah, okay, there's the target. You shot it over here. Um. So I took the trip to Arizona. One of my not my team, but a classmate that I graduated my same high school, Tory fines, was my host. Uh, and they took me to a party there and at the time Lud Olson, great guy. I had been to his camp as a high schooler. Uh, cookie made me breakfast. They took me to a party. There was a lot of Tan girls with long black hair at that party and I don't know if you know what my wife looks like, but they were trying their best to look like my wife. So kind of my type and I really liked that party. It was a good time. So I committed verbally to loot. I told him I'M gonna be an Arizona Wildcat and uh, then, you know, roy won me over. The next week I went to late night and that's a whole different story. But Yeah, U C L A want it in n and Arizona beat us to go on to win it in ninety seven. So both of those schools, uh, you know, playing them and losing to him, when when I could have been on either one of those teams really uh, it did staying when we lost to him. And Uh, uh, you know, I I threatened Mike Bibby within an inch of his life when we became teammates because him and miles Simon absolutely destroyed us in that game in the sweet SIS team. And you know I'm joking when I say that. Like we Mike's a great teammate. We were great friends at the time. So but you know, if that's basketball, you know, if you played long enough, you're gonna playing against people you ate. It, hated playing against it's just it's not that big of a family. Want to get to the NBA. There's only or so active players at any given time. I was lucky enough to be one for over a decade. That's just uh again. For me, that was that was my goal. Um, when you were in Sacramento you had some tough matchups against Kevin Garnett and there were a few rumors about a fight. Dive in on that. Tokyo the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Sacramento Kings played, and I believe it was the first time the at Games in the NBA that were played outside...

...of the U S A. We're going to count against our record and so we flew over to Tokyo to play them for two games and we beat the piss out of him the first game, so we knew we were not gonna win the second game. There was no way they we're gonna let one of us come back oh into or two and up. So we just knew. We went out and had a good time in Tokyo and then got a little chippy in the first game because we were beating the piss out of him. But then we went out and had a good time and I remember I got back later than I should have, uh, and I had an NBA TV appearance at the fish market to film, you know, the famous fish market in Tokyo, and I was supposed to be at that filming at I may or may not have walked into my hotel room at four o'clock. So, Um, I didn't sleep that night. Um, I was not feeling well later in the day and we played that night and we got a little chippy in in the Tokyo Dome, which, by the that was the first time I'd ever played in European guys, is no big deal, but that was the person I ever played in the stadium were they allowed smoking. So it was cool from that Pronto view, because it wasn't overwhelming, but it was just like smoking cigarettes. So I can smell it while I'm playing basketball. It was unusual. It wasn't overwhelming, it wasn't overpowering, it was just different. Um. But this tunnel was the same tunnel for both teams. So we kind of got into it in the game and we're talking and you know, Kevin Likes to get under people's skin and he doesn't get under my skin because I just I don't get that way. It doesn't bother me. But we had some words and then we get into the tunnel and he started yelling at me from behind me. He was a little bit ways behind me. Nothing came of it? No, no actual fists flew. That was mostly one of those NBA fights like hold me back, holding back, you know, a lot of talking, a lot of jaw jacking, um, but no actual fists thrown. Uh. And you know, when we became teammates later, as I just said, you know at some point you're gonna become teammate to somebody you hate if you play long enough. And I hated him. I hated him. I hated Reggie Miller before we were teammates. Um. I hated Great Hill until we were teammates. Um. You know. And and the reason why is because the competitors and those dudes, they just love to play, they want to win. And I love being teammates with Kevin Garnett. I don't have his phone number, we're not great friends, but I love being teammates with him because he was the right man at the right time to help us win that championship. He's he was a great teammate and exactly what the Celtics needed, uh, in that role, in his role, for that team to win it. I love that. I love to hold me back, called me back. There's a lot of that in the NBA. That's most of the NBA fights. It's like they shove each other and then they started looking around like that. That's the that's the elementary school fight, troy, when you want to be the tough kid at elementary school. Well, I got out of that. Is he got beat up by Tokyo and the fish market before Kevin even took a sleep. Yeah, he's like, there's nothing you can do to me that hasn't already holy cow. Yea. was that the worst hangover of your career? The hangover, I was just sick. You don't get fever from alcohol. Alcohol. Yeah, yeah, yeah, it probably would have felt better if I drink more. So there was one time where you, Um, you replaced Tommy on a call with the game. So you called the game with Mike Gorman. How did that come about? And like you must be one of the only guys that were that's been an active player that hasn't gone into media completely. You know, you know, obviously scowl is the first guy you think that's done it full time, but how did it come about where you've got the opportunity to do that, and what was the experience like being to Mike? Yeah, so we I had done that in Sacramento. Um, there when I had a broken spine. Um, I was out for an extended period of time and they let me do some of the Games within their box, and so I've had some history with it. And and then when I was out for the season for the Celtics, they were like Hey, do you want to jump in the box? It was like absolutely, it would be great, and so they let me do that and I think Tommy actually had a family issue anyway, Um, so he had to be gone. It wasn't like we shared a three man box, it was just Tommy had to be somewhere and instead of hiring outside talent, I think they were just like hey, Scott, if you want to be the guy, be the guy. If I remember correctly, that's what it was, and I was like yeah, great, I'll fill in and it was a blast. I've always loved doing it. I did a stint for NBA TV right after I retired, UH, and I've worked for the Pacers UH, several years ago, like I think I stopped in twenties, Um, doing pre and postgame shows for for the Pacers TV. Um. I don't want to be on the road really is why I don't do it Um full time. It's I...

...did that lifestyle and I love my kids and I love my wife and I love being at home, Um, you know. And I'm not making millions of dollars as a broadcaster. That's just a fact. I'm not Charles Barkley or shack. So, you know, not that it wouldn't be worth my time or, if it was, if I was getting paid, you know, six figures. But you know, radio isn't paying that much these days and the broadcasts are more and more. They're getting, you know, even the last two years for sure, you guys know they've been doing them from home. So, uh, they weren't even traveling and that would have been ideal. But then the paycheck doesn't go as well either because you're not getting that pretty Um and extra benefits. So Um, it's it's been consolidated to the point that I just don't know that I would make that sacrifice to be on the road to try to go grind it out and make hundred fifty or something like that. And again, that is incredible money. That's a great job, but as Realtor, as my wife and I are doing about that right now. So I don't have to leave to go do I get to work with my wife? So last time I spoke to you, it was probably about eighteen months ago, if you remember or not. Um, but I remember you mentioning there was an opportunity that arose to join the W W there was a conversation. Now and we're talking about you like being on the MIC, and obviously you've just explained the entire reason why you wouldn't want to go back on the road. But the W W E money is a lot more than what broadcast money is. So I did it for the listeners. How did that discussion come about? And did you ever think of your wrestling stage now, because a lot of thought into what mine would be. Yeah, here's the nicknamed Guy Too, apparently. Actually my friends nicknamed me because I told him immediately about the meeting I had with Vince McMahon, a triple h Um, and they were like, well, you're the honest accession. You just drove the beard around here, where the flat hat and that's it. You're the honest assassion assassin. I can't even see it. So Um, no, I was actually after my rookie year, I got my agent called and said Hey, there's a movie being filmed in Toronto and so they flew me up to Toronto to be in this movie and I never got released. It's called the New Jersey turnpikes, but if you've ever heard of the movie semi pro with Will Ferrell, the New Jersey turnpikes was the first iteration of that movie. It's just that it wasn't funny and so they canned it and they got will ferrell and they made it really funny. But we filmed that whole movie from starting to finish, the exact script and everything, just different characters. We we I was in the New Jersey turnpikes and it was semi pro one and it was just I don't I never saw the movie, but a couple of people that were in the movie saw it and they were like it's terrible. So I guess I single handedly just ruined the production. It's my fault, Um. But so one night after filming I was out to dinner with, ironically, George went norm from cheers, who was yeah, he was in town, Him and something and and some other guys and I got to meet him because of other people in the movie and we're out to dinner and all of a sudden they were like hey, you're Scott Poller, and I was like yeah, they're like, these two guys want to talk to you. So I whever and had dinner with Vince McMahon and triple H, and I had no idea. I really I was twenty four years old. W W was something I never watched as a kid. I didn't really know anything about it. I didn't really know who they were other than I think you're the president of the wrestling thing, Um, and you're one of the wrestlers. And so they were just absolutely trying to see if I my personality matched my look uh, and unfortunately I was very normal and boring, and I think that's why they didn't really pursue it anymore. But really the bottom line was, I think they asked me multiple times, like how much you love the NBA, because you didn't seem to play a lot your rookie year. I was like no, I think I'M gonna stick it out, like I didn't want to quit the NBA and try to do that Um, now after I was done playing in the NBA in two thousand and eight I probably should have looked into it a little bit. Some of my friends were like yeah, man, you should do that. But you know, then there's that whole gaining a whole ton of weight so I looked like a pro wrestler because I was still pretty slender at to seventy Um, and so I did that actually on my own. I gained weight. I got up to three twenty and I was pretty jacked Um and then my heart doctor was like no, who's the weight? Yeah, it's not for you. Your your body, your heart can't tell if it's muscle or fat. It's just three pounds. It's too much. So I dropped the weight and that was kind of the end of that idea of maybe jumping in there. And now I'm just too old and broken. Everything hurts. So No, I'm not doing it. Let me, let me, let me go back to two thousand and eight. There that that that experience where you got the finals. Um. But what was it like to be there? And you know, I guess you you mentioned Pearce and and what it was like, uh, fifteen years earlier, through eleven years earlier. What was he like? But how had he changed at that point? And especially when it came to Kobe Bryant, I remember he just like he wanted Kobe Brian and that in that...

...series. What, what did you kind of see from him in that series? Well, you know, there's no comparison from when he was seventeen, eighteen years old, when we were teammates, because it was just his freshman and sophomore year. We were teammates. Uh, to you know, him being a man man, uh in the NBA finals, and and he was. There was nobody else that was more responsible for us winning that championship with Paul Pierce. He he didn't drag us there, he had help, but in the finals he absolutely was the man. And you know, ray played his role, Kevin played his role, everybody else played their role, but but without Paul being a man man and and just going nuts uh and and just saying, you know what, I'm gonna win this, we are going to win this and I'm gonna win this. He was just incredible and my memory of it is just that he was he was great. He was he was a great player. He didn't back down. You know, there's been arguments of people and earlier in his career or later in his career, he couldn't get it done, he couldn't be the winner and couldn't drag a team um and he needed help. Well, yeah, he got help Um in the form of ray and kg, but, uh, he still wanted and and he was the reason. You know, people say, Oh, why do you wear that ring? I'm like, Paul Pierce want to pull me? That's always been my response. Yeah, and I remember that and that during that series, and this had to be weird for you. I was covering that series and I remember because this was when the donaghee stuff came out, and so of course everybody wanted to ask you about two thousand and two and what had happened. Uh, in that was a game six against the Lakers. Uh, you know, how? How? You know? Did you have to like think a lot about what the answer should be, you know, and and and kind of craftic you mcdavid stern is there, and and and all this, like what was that? You know, what was kind of going through your heads as like all this and and now all of a sudden people want to ask you about something from six years earlier. Well, at the time, yeah, you're a company player, you know, you don't want to insult your employer, uh and and call it for audio lence. So I did watch what I had to say about those events and, Um, you know my my response, I think has been pretty consistent over the years that, first of all, Donna, he didn't ref that game. He wasn't one of the referees of game six and a lot of people think he was just because his name has been associated with it, because he said that game was fixed. Well, we don't know that for sure, uh, and he certainly wasn't one of the referees. So I've been consistent about that and making sure people understand that fact. But the other part of it is, you know, yeah, we lost game six for whatever reason. You can say it was fixed, you can say whatever you want and I won't argue with you. You can say the referees we're in on it and they were told to make sure that they went seven games. I won't argue with you. I don't care. What I do know is we had game seven because we were the best team in the NBA that year. We had home court throughout the playoffs and we had game seven at home and we shipped the bed. And that's the problem with with that whole series. I don't mind that we lost game six for whatever reason, even if it was the filthiest game ever, and it might be. But we had a chance to go home and win in front of our home crowd, which at the time was the best crowd in the NBA, and we didn't. And so that's the part that really bothers me, is is we went home and the and the champions did what champions do. Kobe and shack played like men then and and they took the two us and we didn't. We didn't recover from game six, and that's not what champions do. Champions have a short memory. You make mistakes and you've got to be ready for the next play. We we messed up a game, uh, and even if it was unfair, even if it was fixed, whatever, we didn't recover from game six to game seven and bring our a game. And that's what champions do. Champions are ready, and especially game seven at home. So that's that's my whole take on that. I don't care about if there was something going on in game six. Um. You know, actually, I think two of the three referees and I are friends on facebook. Now, uh, if I'm if I'm correct, I think one of them was Bob Delaney and one wash. Um, I'm staring at his face right now, Teddy Bernhardt, I believe those were two of the three refs, and Dick Movetta. Yeah, Bob sent me his book. I've read his book. It's called covert and he signed it for me. He spelled my name with two TS, like thanks, Jackass, but it's a really good book. I'm not knocking Bob. And Teddy is he's living in Puerto Rico but he's from Indiana apparently. So he messages me every once in a while. And so, like I said, I if you want to go down that road, I can talk about ways that the NBA could have fixed that game, but again, ultimately it doesn't matter what happened. We had game seven at home and we didn't deliver. Yeah, I want to kind of talk about I want to do a little bit of a compare and contrast from your time in the NBA to where we're at now, because we have Lebron James, who is just an incredible athlete you got to witness at firsthand. I want to note do you feel like he is a as good as he was in two thousand...

...seven? Do you think he's better? Obviously we've seen a progression in his mentals. But do you feel like that is the reason why he's been able to carry on and perform at the level he has been? Um, I think it starts with physical first of all, I don't know how he's even running anymore, the amount of punishment he has put into that body and the size he is. I mean, the guy's a freaking dinosaur, and I'm talking about age and size. The fact that he's too six five and he's just pounding those knees for this many years. It's incredible that he's even healthy, let alone still dunking on people. So when when you're gifted with that type of longevity from a physical standpoint and you put that much effort into it. I'm not kno going to because he's clearly put a lot of effort into keeping his body on the top physical form. Um, but when you're gifted with that ability to stay healthy for that long, that's incredible by itself. You can set records in the NBA just by playing twenty years in the NBA. That's incredible and I'm not saying it's given if you play that long, but it certainly is. Number One, you've got to be healthy to be out there on the court to be able to do those things and he's been healthier than most for however long it's been. To your point about whether he's better now than in two thousand and seven, we all get better as we get older. Because he's physically able, he's got more knowledge. I would say he's a better passer, uh than he was then. Back then he just kind of threw the ball where he wanted you to be and if you weren't there, it was it was a turnover and so he yell at you. But you know, my my comeback was like, you know, the great pastors hit the player. They don't throw it where they think you're gonna go. You hit you hit me in the hands and I'm gonna catch it. You hit me anywhere in this in this region, and it's a big region, I'm gonna catch it, but don't throw where you think I'm going, because I may not go there. I might see something else, you know, squirrel or something. So Um. You know, I think he's a better passer and I think that also, you know, he's he's got talent around him lately in the last five or six years, more than we had in two thousand and seven. So again with Paul and the other two in Boston. And you know, the other teams, the other Super Teams, Warriors, you know, I don't need to go on the list. You guys know. But when you're talking about, you know, him in two thousand and seven taking us, you know, to the finals and not another hall of fame player on that roster, that's a little bit crazy. Uh, you know, we're all good, we're all in the NBA, but that's that's pretty impressive and we had a really good record that you I think we were second in the east. And so you know, when you when you fast forward ten years and he's playing with three hall of Famers, or or at least two for the last five or six years on every team he's been on, it's like, you know, the pressure is not as high because he's got a lot of help Um, and then the pressure then becomes managing Egos as opposed to, uh, you know, who's who's going to be the man, because it's that's the problem is when you've got three guys or four guys that think they're the man that can tear up a team and it causes trades at a New Jersey right now you know, there's people that think they're the man and they don't realize that there's five to eight NBA players at any given time. There are generational talents. Lebron is one of them and I'm not going to name all the rest of them are in the NBA right now because I don't know them all, but you know he's one of them and if you're not him and you're on his team, you're not the man. Lebron is the man and you've got to figure out your role to support the man, and I think that's what worked well in two thousand seven and Cleveland. We all knew we were role players compared to him. Uh and I think when when he doesn't win at all on the teams he's been on lately, it's because they haven't managed the egos very well and the other players are still trying to be the man. When they have to defer, you have to defer to the man and then you'll be better because everybody has their role and they know their role. MM HMM. So going to do another comparison from the career to now, but it's not going to be about Lebron, because Le Bron gets enough publicity as it is. Um, we're being honest. So Celtics podcast Robert Williams when he was playing. Did you ever come up against the big man that was comparative to him in skill set, wise, explosive nurse length, and if so, how did you deal with that guy, defending him or trying to score on him? And how would you translate that now if Rob Williams was trying to defend you? Well, that's a tough question for me to answer because I don't know who Robert I'm literally like my heart sank, like really, I don't watch him, I don't know who that is. Okay, so the dude can jump like he could touch probably like, this is exaggerating slightly, he can probably touch the rafters when he jumps like he's like he's on extreme believe, the...

...most athletic big man in the League right now. So that's it. Basically, I was super athletic shot blocker that can past like like probably one of the top six best passing beaks. Okay, well, Um, I played against Patrick Ewing, Kim Elai, Juan, Charles Barkley, yeoming uh, I played against well, lad with Latte. I played against shack in his prime. I played against U Um Sean Bradley, I played against George Miroson. I played against about every go, David Robinson, Sam Duncan. Uh. You know, I don't want to leave with ut Karl Malone. Uh. So, I think I played against some of the best ever to play in those positions, the four and the five, and so I think I held my own for the most part. Now, I'm not saying I didn't get dunked on, because everybody does if you try to block shots. And that's the funny thing about people are like, Oh man, you got dunked on a lot. was like, well, I also block block shots. Just kind of goes with it. You cannot get dunked on by never trying to block anybody's shot. That's how it works. Um. But Um, and I know I left out some some top fifty players of guys that I played against. I just you know, I can't rattle them all off. But Um, so I would say that, you know, if I was to go up against a guy like that, but against White Howard when he was young and Bouncy and he was an incredible athlete. I wouldn't say he was the best passer, but he was an incredible athlete in those days. He was in the slam dunk contests and all that. And you know, you manage those guys because they're light guys that can fly like that. They don't wait to hunter and seventy pounds, I did, and so you can manage them by by keeping a body on him and and for Dwight, I can put my hand across this whole lower back because he was that narrow, and so that's what I did and he got mad. He started complaining the Ref he's older me, he's on me. I was like no, I got one hand on it. That's it. It's just that hand is on your whole back, but you can't move because you want to wait to hun and twenty pounds. And so that there. There are ways of managing people that are more athletic than you, and most of the people that I played against were better than me, and so you learned those techniques of what bothers him and and some of them don't like contacts and them don't like being talked to. Someone don't like, uh, you know, a bump, or they don't like he pulling the stool out, you know, whatever it is. Someone like the contact because they like to know where you are and then you fade away from him and they travel, you know. So you just you figure out those little niches and little things that the tricks that work. Uh. And so yeah, for Robert Williams, I probably play him like I did against white. Put my hands on them and make sure I know where he is all the time so he's not getting away from me, because David Robinson was the same way. He was really narrow and he was so quick and he was a great passer and that baseline jump shot was just unstoppable. And so I had to make sure I had my hands on David. But then, you know, his back got bad and they slowed him down and he didn't play as much. As you know, I caught him at the end of his career. But Um, yeah, Robert Williams would be my Dwight Howard and I would just hold on to him. I will say you want miss if you're ever gonna lunk s break, like you know you're waiting to show a house or somebody's late to come and see the house and everything's laid out, just get the phone out. Going to youtube. Robert Williams highlights you're gonna have the best time. You'RE NOT gonna want you're gonna want to sell the house to Robert Williams so you can become friends. You're a big fan of he is. All right. I didn't have one more thing. Where that is. You know some of the stuff. Obviously we've seen what Kevin Durant this summer. He's kind of dominated to someone. Now they got together and they met and apparently everybody's happy, Um with what you know about how an NBA team works and the inner workings of an NBA team. Can everything just be fine for a team like that ever going through? You know what they just went through. I don't think Steve Nash makes it much longer. Honestly, it's always the coach. They're not gonna fire the hundred and fifty million dollar player, they're gonna fire whatever met. Steve's getting paid ten million a year or five million a year. That's peanuts compared to Katie's making and they're they're not going to see keep Steve Nass coach. So Um, that's how those things work. When, when, when a team bails on the coach? Uh, and if your star players nailed on the coach, then it's easy for the rest of the team to go. Well, I'm not playing as much as I wanted to either, and that it's probably the coach. It's not me, you know, I'm showing up ten minutes late and leaving fifteen minutes early. What? Why would it be me? It's not me. It's got to be the coach. So Um, you know that that is problematic. Locker rooms are very easy to destroy and that's why it's really hard to win when your top player is playing games, is acting out in certain ways. And I don't know. I heard that he said he wanted to fire to the GM and the coach, and it's like you just got a hundred and ninety million or whatever. Just sorry, shut up and dribble, man. I'd be happy when I got my six years. You know. I was like, I will shut up and dribble for all for all six years. You just tell me where to be, I will be there. You tell me where we're going, I will be...

...there early. I will do everything you asked me to do, because you're making me a wealthy person. Well, rich, not wealthy, Um, Chris Rock, but no, and again I don't know. So I'm not knocking, Katie, I mean one of my oldest friends and best friends is an assistant coach there and I haven't talked to him at all. Jock van and I were in college roommates, Uh and, so I've known jock for most of our lives. Were Day a parties, a day over than me. We were pretty close. But I don't call him and talk to him about stuff like that because I'm not gonna sit there and try to get gossip from him. That's just not how we are. We talk and catch up about our families and stuff. I'm not gonna sit there and call him and ask him about work other than how's it going? Are you gonna be there this year? So I don't know what's going on that locker room. But what I do know, as you asked, you know franchises, programs, all of that. The Front Office can be unstable and ruin the talent that they put together. The owner can be overbearing and try to lack Roman and ruined the talent or try to bring in talent they think is better, and they don't let the basketball people do the basketball stuff, in the form of hiring a NERD GM as opposed to a basketball GM and you all know what I'm talking about. Um, you know, there's a place for numbers, there's a place for basketball, knowledge and and it's a delicate mixture and when you're trying to bake a cake with, you know, three million dollars, it's difficult and there's a lot of moving pieces and a lot of the little fractions of ingredients that got to be right, and it's hard when you're big one, you're you're hundred fifty million dollar. A hundred nine million dollar ingredient isn't on board with what's going on. So it could be terrible, but my guess is if it doesn't, if it if it's fine, it's fine. You know, if they kiss and make up, it's possible. But my guess is they lose a few games, Steve Nash gets fired and maybe John vron gets promoted to the head coach. Who knows? I'm gonna make you put your dad cap on for just a second. You mentioned earlier that you wanted, like your goal was to get to the NBA play for years and that's what your focus was on. Not many people can say that they made that goal when they were younger and then achieved their dream. Um, I want to know, do you have any advice for any of the younger generation that's out there, any words of wisdom that you can give as a dad or as somebody who's accomplished one of the biggest dreams that they set out? Uh, you know, you have to take it with a grain of salt, because I did need to live out my child in a journey, and the reason I did that was much like my last analogy, there's a lot of of moving parts. I'm the son of a legend, so I got talent. My whole family is giants. I have three brothers bigger than me. I'm the youngest of six kids and they beat the crap out of me when I was growing up. I was the small I'm still there's three of my brothers are still taller than me, and so they used to beat the crap out of me when I wasn't being Um. So I learned a lot of things as a child that not everybody gets to you just because of my birth order. Um, you know, my older my older siblings grew up more well off and then my dad lost everything when I was a little kid and so I grew up very different than my siblings and very like on government substance and checks and you know, checks from the government and welfare and that kind of stuff, and so, uh, that that created a different upbringing for me. And then my dad died when I was sixteen. So those are all things that I feel like we're impetus to making me tough and making me understand that life wasn't just that I got a gift, it was are you going to use this gift? Are you gonna take this blessing and use it to the best of your potential? And so that's what I want to give speeches. You know, I give them to corporations. I say similar things that I say to corporations that I say to schools. where it is is, you know, everyone has opportunities every single day. You can be late to work, you can you can call it in and just do your bare minimum work and you still get paid, or you can show up early. You can interact with your boss and say how am I doing, and be humble and work your butt off. You can go to your teachers, if you're in school, and you can go in and say, Hey, I don't have an a m this class. Is there any way I can get one. Can I do some extra credit? And I tell my kids this all the time, and my too, older ones are great, great students. But my my fresh or a sophomore now in high school. He's getting better, but he's not the greatest student. He's a foodsball player in football. I call it the foods ball from later. But but he's a football player and and and he just he cares more about running around hitting people than than you know, hit the books. But you know, Um, it is about your discipline. It is about setting yourself apart from everybody else is just as talented or shows up to the same job you have, shows up to the same school you have. What are you setting yourself apart with? Are you setting yourself apart with just being a jackass and doing a bare minimum and and then nobody notices you're there? Cool, if that makes it so you don't have any anxiety and you just kind of fit in, that's fine. But if you want to improve your station in life, you gotta do something that makes you better than the other people that are trying to do the thing you're doing. And so, again, because of my birth order, I watched my brothers do things I watched to make decisions. Ron...

Mormon. All four of them went on missions for the church and all of them came back overweight and got hurt and they while they were gone their coaches changed because they got fired, you know. And so there were things that like even choosing my college was because of my brother's experience in college and I had that. I could have ignored all that instead of there they're them on me, I'm gonna do my thing. But I watched them and I learned those things. I took them in. I was like, I'm not going to a college where the coach might get fired or leave while I'm there. I mean, Roy Williams promised me he wasn't leaving during my four years. I made him. I was like, Roy, I will believe you if you tell me, but I'm not coming here unless you promise that you're not leaving from North Carolina and until at least I'm done. And he promised me and he stayed and in funny story, it got it got around. All the recruits after me that were big time recruits heard about that and they all made him promise. In the last two players who promised, with Nick Holinson and Kirk Conrad and then that's after their careers. Nobody. He didn't promise anybody else after them. So he's probably kicking you for that now a little bit. I think he wanted to leave earlier because there was an opening earlier and I think he was ready to leave, but he had promised his players, uh, and then he promised Nick and Kurt and so yeah, but you know the pressure is. Are you going to put pressure in yourself to be different? You can do what everybody else can do and you'll get by. We can all find a job, we can all go do this or do that and find something that's gonna occupy your time. You'RE gonna make some money and you can have a job. He might be fine with that and that's cool. Again, a lot of kids nowadays dealing with anxiety more than ever before. And and I say, you know, anxiety is a good thing. Anxiety is supposed to be part of our personality. Why? Because it kept US alive when they were Saber Tooth Tigers hunting us. You know, you're supposed to have anxiety, and so that's what I try to tell kids like hey, when you feel that like Oh, that means you're supposed to be doing something. That means go out and start running if you want to be a better runner, if you want to get better shape, lifts of weights. You know that anxiety is telling you you're not doing enough, because if you're sitting around just being anxious and you think a pill is gonna fix it, you're wrong. You gotta go do something with that anxiety. You gotta work it out, you gotta go study it out, you're gonna go read it out, you gotta go and prove yourself. And that's true for adults, but it's more true with kids now, because kids are just and those kids mine and mine too, they all are there. It's there's a big anxiety epidemic out there and I just hope we can get through it and it's up to our generation to parent these kids and teach them to to deal with anxiety, manage it and don't try to don't don't try to drug it, don't try to put a pill in it, because pills ain't gonna fix it. I appreciate that so much. You have given us so many good stories and like the last little bit kind of touched me, so I really appreciate that. But thank you for taking your time and hanging out with us. I hope we all get nicknames by the end of this podcast, but I really appreciate that you came on and you're awesome. Thank you so much. Well, there's Liney and foggy and the girl and the girl. You gotta clean your camera a little bit, Dude. It's a little foggy. Maybe wipe that thing down, but you look like you're like it's a little foggy. You might want to clean the camera off, which is beautiful. Sean, no, not the Limy, not Li me. Oh Yeah, okay, I'm cool with that. The camera is not funny. I'm chill. I'm just glad that Adam can't use my name, name against me. Now, lie me, I'm going with all right. Well, thank you so much, Scott, with one T. thank you, gang hey. Really thanks for bringing me down memory lane. I love talking about the old days. I don't think about him much because, again, I'm just a realtor now. I don't Talk Pople Watch basketball much anymore. So thanks for walking me down memory lane. I appreciate it. Remember Robert Williams? Well, I'm gonna Google Robert Williams right now. I might get stuck on Jason Williams, but you know, I might look at completely understandable. Yeah, white chocolate, not the murder the end one documentary that. Yeah, however, seen that yet, but I'll check it out. All right, everyone, thank you again for listening to the Celtics Collective podcast. Um, I hope you enjoyed the interview that Maddie, Seawan and Adam did with Scott Pollard. Um. He told some really good stories. Um, I hope you enjoyed those. Let us know any other guests or Celtics adjacent players and Um, other people, analysts, writers, Um, that we could have on the podcast and we'll be sure to have them as interviews as well. Is that's something we want to do a bit more of. But as always, UM, follow, subscribe, rate, review, Um, anywhere you get your podcast, anywhere you're listening to us, make sure to follow and also keep an eye on what we do at heavy sports and check out heavy on Celtics and, Um, the great articles that our writers are putting out there every day. And so thank you again for listening.

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